Visiting the Capitol, by Nicole


On the last day of the trip we took a tour of the US Capitol especially adapted for
those who are visually impaired. The guide did a wonderful job of adapting the tour to those of us who were visually impaired. He engaged us with interesting facts and included many descriptions that enabled us to “visualize” what we could not see. There were also many “touch” opportunities.

We visited Statuary Hall where each state is allowed to put two statues of important people from the history of the state. Gov. John Sevier is in Statuary Hall as the only statue from Tennessee since Andrew Jackson was President and his statue is in another location. Statuary Hall was used as the House of Representatives in the early years of the Capitol. One of the interesting facts I learned was about the acoustics of the Hall. John Quincy Adams served as  Representative and always appeared to be asleep but in reality he was eavesdropping on the other members of the chamber who were sitting on the opposite side of the room. Due to where his desk was placed and how the acoustics work he was able to hear conversations taking place across the hall. Abraham Lincoln served in the House for a time before being defeated and we saw where his desk was located. We also saw the Rotunda with its breathtaking artwork on the ceiling that was commissioned by congress in the early days of the nation. The dome of the Capitol is cast iron topped by a statue that is about 20 feet tall.

I really enjoyed our tour because it was filled with historical information and interesting facts. Having been to the Capitol before, many years ago, half-buried facts in my head were awakened and I also learned some new facts, not just on this tour but on the rest of the trip.

I really enjoyed the trip to Washington DC.

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